Opinion: Yes, rape is a culture of the Nigerian society

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6 Responses

  1. Ramat Musa says:

    Thank you for this write up. We need harsher punishments that are actually carried out for evil men that carry out these acts and our female representatives in the house of assemblies and reps should wake up and push for a bill that truly protects women.

  2. ani says:

    The culture in this country is to blame the victim and by doing so we are condoning the crime. I once heard on the radio in lagos and the speaker was justifying rape by saying the victim must have been wearing exposing clothes. The speaker sounded learned, the guys I was in the car with were but not one of them saw the error in that thinking. This made me really angry. There’s no justification for rape. Its the most brutal and intrusive thing one can experience.

  3. david motutu says:

    Dis is a dreadful, long-surviving vice amidst d youths! A transmitted cultural disease amidst younger boys and men, learnt from d older youths, as well as those dat see such dastard act as ‘normal thing’ or ‘boys runs’ followed by derisive giggles!

    I pray none of d young ladies I know fall victims of such socially condoned craft! But it starts from mAking a mad noise out of it d moment they happen! Pamper d victims, waylay d perpetrators!!!

    Its evil – a satanic craft of violent possession of d female private cavity instored in d 1st place by God 2 aid procreation! But right now Satan in d heart of men, young men, devow them with vile contempt!

  4. Mr Mazi is indeed very good with English, and I respect his articulation. However, I think there is no point over-emphasizing the problems. Gifted writers like Mazi should dwell more on the solutions, solutions to the root causes of the many problems of Nigeria. When more emphasis is placed on the negatives, we inadvertently make something absurd seem normal. I think that was part of what he meant when he condemned the way some reporters caption rape incidence, but unfortunately, the title of his write-up will also have the same unintended effect of making rapists, and will-be rapists associate a measure of normalcy with the act, at least within Nigeria. I am of the opinion that he over-exaggerated the situation. I am not carried away by his linguistic prowess. I know I maybe younger, but haven lived in Nigeria for 26 years, and of course in different parts, I can honestly say that I have never had an encounter with rape, remotely or otherwise. But that is not to say there are no cases of rape in Nigeria (of course, I read them in papers), but I vehemently disagree that it is a culture of the Nigerian society.

  5. Mr Mazi is indeed very good with English, and I respect his articulation. However, I think there is no point over-emphasizing the problems. Gifted writers like Mazi should dwell more on the solutions, solutions to the root causes of the many problems of Nigeria. When more emphasis is placed on the negatives, we inadvertently make something absurd seem normal. I think that was part of what he meant when he condemned the way some reporters caption rape incidence, but unfortunately, the title of his write-up will also have the same unintended effect of making rapists, and will-be rapists associate a measure of normalcy with the act, at least within Nigeria. I am of the opinion that he over-exaggerated the situation. I am not carried away by his linguistic prowess. I know I maybe younger, but haven lived in Nigeria for 26 years, and of course in different parts, I can honestly say that I have never had an encounter with rape, remotely or otherwise. But that is not to say there are no cases of rape in Nigeria (of course, I read them in papers), but I vehemently disagree that it is a culture of the Nigerian society.