Rejoinder: A note of warning to the so-called blogtivists

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7 Responses

  1. Interesting this rejoinder. I read the first piece not with a lot of shaking of the head but some nods and 'er..well'. While I understand the need to set records straight (I blog on social issues and do a whole lot of microblogging on issues of the moment) I think Mr Egbunike points are well taken. The "few" bloggers you speak of do have a large ffing. Their following could even be larger than that of all the other bloggers combined so I understand it seeming like these 'blogotivists' have taken over the entire digtal space, and their arrogance is to say the least legendary(Unconfirmed studies have shown that the larger your following the more arrogant you become). However, I do know of some who are more human and humane and who are willing to engage. At the final analysis, sieving the wheat from the weed is an action we all must take. As with even the traditional media, each message should be swallowed with a pinch of salt…or sometimes two. I should say thank you to you and to Mr Egbunike for bringing these issues up for discuss.

  2. Abigail says:

    Interesting this rejoinder. I read the first piece not with a lot of shaking of the head but some nods and ‘er..well’. While I understand the need to set records straight (I blog on social issues and do a whole lot of microblogging on issues of the moment) I think Mr Egbunike points are well taken. The “few” bloggers you speak of do have a large ffing. Their following could even be larger than that of all the other bloggers combined so I understand it seeming like these ‘blogotivists’ have taken over the entire digtal space, and their arrogance is to say the least legendary(Unconfirmed studies have shown that the larger your following the more arrogant you become). However, I do know of some who are more human and humane and who are willing to engage. At the final analysis, sieving the wheat from the weed is an action we all must take. As with even the traditional media, each message should be swallowed with a pinch of salt…or sometimes two. I should say thank you to you and to Mr Egbunike for bringing these issues up for discuss.

  3. Interesting stuff. Great to see Nigerians engage in intellectual debates. We really need to up the ante and encourage as many of our people to get involved, especially the younger ones. Let them not see social media as a means of peddling rumors and pornography or even insulting others and spreading hate but as a means to express themselves in a civil manner and present their point of view on matters that concern all. Whether their proposal is simple or well thought out is subjective. The most important thing to me is that you present in a decent and civil manner. Blogging is still a relatively new trend in Nigeria and soon, the credible bloggers will start emerging for all to see. Popular bloggers seem to have the tendency to develop arrogance complexes but the openness of the debate platform acts as a reality check for them. That in itself is a regulation mechanism for the concept of blogging. I believe it should be encouraged to thrive as a means of social interaction.

  4. what happens on Twitter is a total shame. some twitter 'overloads' have arrogated to themselves sole custodians of knowledge and everything right and progressive. They will sneer and call you all manner of names if you held any opinion contrary to theirs on national issues, and will only engage you if you reinforced all of their views without question. What a shameful irony!

  5. zebbook says:

    Brilliant! I love the fact that this rejoinder focused solely on the issues raised by the other author who probably had an unfavourable encounter with one or two social media activists and erroneously generalized. Well done.

  6. zebbook says:

    Unverified studies have shown that the more followers you have on twitter, the harder it is to engage everyone.