NCDC confirms 10 cases of Monkeypox in 6 states | What you should know about the disease

monkeypox outbreak in bayelsa

The NCDC had reported 21 cases and one death on May 28, now it reports that 10 new cases of monkeypox have been confirmed in six states.

The agency, in its recent monkeypox update, said 44 new suspected cases of monkeypox were reported from May 30 to June 5 from 14 states, of which 10 were confirmed positive from six states.

The states with new confirmed cases are Edo (2), Rivers (2), Plateau (2), Lagos (2), Ondo (1) and Imo (1).

“From January 1st to 5th June 2022, there have been 110 suspected cases in total and 31 confirmed cases from twelve (12) states – Adamawa (5), Lagos (6), River (3), Cross River (2), FCT (2), Kano (2), Delta (2), Bayelsa (2), Edo (2), Imo (2), Plateau (2), and Ondo (1),” the report reads.

“One death was recorded in a 40-year-old man with co-morbidity that was receiving immunosuppressive drugs

“Since September 2017, Nigeria has continued to report sporadic cases of monkeypox (MPX). On May 26th 2022, a monkeypox National Emergency Operations Centre (EOC) was activated in response to the risk assessment conducted, which put Nigeria at high risk for a Monkeypox outbreak.

“The essence of the activation was to improve the coordination of related preparedness/response activities across the country.

“Overall and from September 2017 to 5th June 2022, a total of 622 suspected cases have been reported from 33 states in the country.

“Of the reported cases, 257 (41.3%) have been confirmed in 23 states – Rivers (55), Bayelsa (45), Lagos (36), Delta (31), Cross River (16), Edo (12), Imo (10), Akwa Ibom (7), Oyo (6), FCT (8), Plateau (5), Adamawa (5), Enugu (4), Abia (3), Nasarawa (2), Benue (2), Anambra (2), Ekiti (2), Kano (2), Ebonyi (1), Niger (1), Ogun (1) and Ondo (1).

“In addition, from September 2017 to June 5th, 2022, a total of nine (9) deaths have been recorded (CFR= 3.5%) in six states – Lagos (3), Edo (2), Imo (1), Cross River (1), FCT (1) and Rivers (1).”

What is Monkeypox?

Monkeypox

Monkeypox is a rare disease caused by infection with the monkeypox virus. Monkeypox virus belongs to the Orthopoxvirus genus in the family Poxviridae. The Orthopoxvirus genus also includes variola virus (which causes smallpox), vaccinia virus (used in the smallpox vaccine), and cowpox virus.

According to WHO, “Monkeypox is a viral zoonosis (a virus transmitted to humans from animals) with symptoms similar to those seen in the past in smallpox patients, although it is clinically less severe. With the eradication of smallpox in 1980 and subsequent cessation of smallpox vaccination, monkeypox has emerged as the most important orthopoxvirus for public health. Animal hosts include a range of rodents and non-human primates.”

The monkeypox virus is a member of the same family of viruses as smallpox, although it is much less severe and experts say chances of infection are low.

Symptoms

Initial symptoms include fever, headaches, swellings, back pain, and aching muscles.

Once the fever breaks a rash can develop, often beginning on the face, and then spreading to other parts of the body, most commonly the palms of the hands and soles of the feet.

The rash, which can be extremely itchy or painful, changes and goes through different stages before finally forming a scab, which later falls off. The lesions can cause scarring.

The infection usually clears up on its own and lasts between 14 and 21 days.

How to catch it?

Monkeypox can be spread when someone is in close contact with an infected person. The virus can enter the body through broken skin, the respiratory tract or through the eyes, nose or mouth.

It can be spread by contact with infected animals such as monkeys, rats and squirrels, or by virus-contaminated objects, such as bedding and clothing.

The virus can get into your body through a break in the skin (which you might not even be aware of) or through your mouth, nose, or eyes. You can breathe it in, but you’d probably have to be in close contact for a fairly long time. That’s because most droplets don’t travel very far.

What to do?

If you think you’ve been exposed to monkeypox, call your doctor for instructions. Look out for symptoms for 21 days after your first exposure. 

There’s no specific treatment for monkeypox. Your doctor will likely help keep you comfortable and try to ward off serious complications with rest, plenty of fluids, and over-the-counter meds.

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